Christmas Angels

This year we spent our advent time focusing on Christ our King so our colour scheme for Christmas was red and gold. At the last minute I decided the table looked a bit bare so I had to figure a quick fix for the next day – here are the instructions for the gold angles we decided to add to our Christmas table.

You’ll need some gold cardboard and gold doylies, if you don’t have gold ones you can use white and spray paint them – but then you need to allow time for them to dry, tape and scissors.

Cut the cardboard into circles the same size as the doylies for the bodies and smaller circles for the heads. Then cut a straight line from the edge of the large, body circle to the centre of the circle.

Then fold these to make a cone and tape them closed.

Cut the doyly into quarters. Use 2 quarters to make the wings. Place them in the correct position and tape them together then tape them to the body. You may need to use your fingers to place them in the correct position.

 

Next roll some tape so it becomes double sided tape and use it to add the head to the body.

 

There you have it some lovely angels for your Christmas table!

Play Dough Recipe

We just love play dough and I have found the most amazing recipe that keeps in the fridge for months.

We keep each colour in a separate packet for as long as possible but eventually it all ends up mixed together and then it’s time for a new batch! Play dough is used for rolling and cutting activities which are fantastic for fine-motor and large motor development. We sometimes use it to make baskets or snakes and the kids love rolling it between their hands. Other times it is whipped out to be used in a maths activity or as food for the dolls. This last week my older son even used it to balance the nose of his glider he’d made for a science experiment.

The little ones love using it but it isn’t unusual to notice one of the older children hi-jack the activity. This is one easy to make, cheap educational product that you can make readily available to your child at any time. Have Fun

Play Dough Recipe
from Jackie French’s book “Natural Solutions”
2 cups flour
1 cup salt
4 Tablespoons cream of tartar
2 cups water
2 Tablespoons veg oil food colouring

Add all ingrdients – except food colouring – into a pan. (You can add a few drops of Dettol, eucalyptus or tea-tree oil to make it last longer) Stir until smooth over a low heat. Once thick like dough, take off and leave to cool. Divide into balls and add food colouring to each ball and knead in. Keep in the fridge in an airtight container and throw out any bits that become discoloured or smell.

My 7yr old make a viking ship!

String Painting

Recently we had great fun doing “string painting.” I put some paint into old meat trays and a piece of string for each child, in each tray.


Once they were sitting down they were each given a piece of paper and I put down one tray. They each took a piece of string and streaked it or twirled it around their page. Once that colour was done I gave them the next colour. This was simply to prevent them from mixing all the colours and ending up with a brown page. If I had only used 2 primary colours I may have given them to them at the same time to witness colour mixing! We worked our way through each colour and produced some wonderful pictures. Something I learned was that the string must not be too long as they find it difficult to handle.

This activity is a fantastic one as it not only encourages creativity but introduces exposure to texture and friction. It develops fine motor skills and figure ground discrimination. The figure ground development in this case is interesting as they are actually witnessing the building of layer upon layer. After the activity it’s interesting to ask them what colour we used first and where is that colour now? Or “how come the red is under all the other colours?”

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